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OSS commander selected for 182nd Vice Commander

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Timothy D. Stumbaugh, then the commander of the 182nd Operations Support Squadron, is pictured in Peoria, Ill., Feb. 2, 2013. Stumbaugh was selected to become the 182nd Airlift Wing’s new vice commander Nov. 6, 2014. Stumbaugh is an U.S. Air Force Academy graduate with more than 10,000 hours flying military and civilian aircraft. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by SSgt Lealan Buehrer/Released)

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Timothy D. Stumbaugh, then the commander of the 182nd Operations Support Squadron, is pictured in Peoria, Ill., Feb. 2, 2013. Stumbaugh was selected to become the 182nd Airlift Wing’s new vice commander Nov. 6, 2014. Stumbaugh is an U.S. Air Force Academy graduate with more than 10,000 hours flying military and civilian aircraft. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by SSgt Lealan Buehrer/Released)

PEORIA, Ill. -- The commander of the 182nd Operations Support Squadron was selected to become the 182nd Airlift Wing's new vice commander November 6. He is scheduled to begin his duties during the December unit training assembly.

Lt. Col. Timothy D. Stumbaugh is a U.S. Air Force Academy graduate with more than 10,000 hours flying military and civilian aircraft. He joined the 182nd Airlift Wing in September 2005 from active duty, and served as a flight commander and operations officer here before becoming the operations support squadron commander.

Lt. Col. Stumbaugh said he sees his new duties as being support for Wing Commander Col. William Robertson, administering his special projects, and being a representative of the wing and the Illinois Air National Guard, both within the service and the local community.

"I am a lead-by-example type who believes that I would never ask anyone to do something I would not do, or haven't already done," he said. "I feel that I must have operational and personal credibility at all times. This is embodied by our core values."

The lieutenant colonel has a strong history of leadership, having been the distinguished honor graduate of his aircraft commander and C-130
instructor pilot courses, as well as having been a training officer. In his 19 years of service, the traditional Guardsman has piloted the T-37 Tweet, T-44 Pegasus and C-130 Hercules aircraft, as well as Boeing 737s for Southwest Airlines. He has deployed with Peoria's wing four times in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

"Lt Col Stumbaugh will be an asset to the wing as a whole," said Col. William Robertson, the commander of the 182nd Airlift Wing. "He is a proven leader, gifted aviator, and epitomizes the citizen-Airmen of this wing. We look forward to his perspective and will put him to work right away. He has a strong, solid background and will continue the excellence established by his predecessors."

Lt. Col. Stumbaugh already has his eyes on issues that could face his Airmen.

"I am concerned at a macro level about the continued challenges presented throughout the world while our military continues to be squeezed by economics," he said. "On a personal level, I pray that I will be up to the task of supporting Col. Robertson and the group commanders. This base is so full of exceptional people, I want to ensure I can contribute and not be a liability!"

Though Lt. Col. Stumbaugh has been assigned to Peoria for nine years, his new position will introduce him to many new faces.

"I most look forward to getting to know more about the other units on base that I have not had the opportunity to work with closely before this new role. As a traditional Guardsman for my entire time at Peoria, sometimes I feel like I don't know many people outside of ops and maintenance. I am excited that I now have the chance to remedy that," he said.

Lt. Col. Stumbaugh resides in Virginia with his wife and two sons.  In his off-duty time, he enjoys playing golf, rooting for the Arkansas Razorbacks, and coaching his sons' baseball and basketball teams. He and his spouse stay active in their church and in the elementary school their children attend.