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Let’s Get Informed About Binge Drinking

Man posing for portrait.

U.S. Air Force civilian Matthew Palmisano, the director of Psychological Health with the 182nd Airlift Wing, Illinois Air National Guard, poses for a portrait in Peoria, Ill., Dec. 18, 2020. In his role, Palmisano helps support the Air National Guard mental health mission statement to ensure, maintain and enhance mission readiness by promoting individual, family, and community resilience through readily accessible and exceptional psychological health services. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Lealan Buehrer)

PEORIA, Ill. --

The holidays are behind us but we are still in the middle of the COVID pandemic. There are many risks of drinking too much, however, drinking is still seen as a fun activity. But as we know it can be a slippery slope from one drink to binge drinking. In the U.S., binge drinking means drinking an amount of alcohol in two hours that causes your BAC level to reach 0.08%. BAC refers to the amount of alcohol in your bloodstream.

•For women, that is usually four standard drinks in two hours

•For men, that is usually five standard drinks in two hours

Key word: “usually.” Alcohol affects everyone differently based on many factors. For some, it may take more drinks to raise their BAC to 0.08%. For others, especially those on prescription medications or other drugs, it may take a smaller amount of alcohol to reach a binge drinking level. It’s best to monitor how alcohol affects you personally. Don’t assume you can have four or five drinks in two hours and be under 0.08% just because others can.

Why do people binge drink?

There are many reasons that people may push their limit. Perhaps they had a rough day and want to let off steam, or they are celebrating a promotion or graduation. Other reasons could be deeper rooted – people may rebel and drink because they were told not to, or they challenge their buddy shot for shot to prove something. No matter the reason, binge drinking is risky.

It’s easy to get carried away when you’re out with friends, or even having a chill night in. Remember that your body can only handle a certain amount of alcohol. Please feel free to call or stop by if you have any questions.

Matthew Palmisano, MSW, LICSW, US ARMY CPT (Ret)
Director of Psychological Health
182d Medical Group (MDG)
2416 S. Falcon Blvd.
Peoria, IL 61607-5023
Comm: 309-633-5774  DSN: 724-5774
Mobile: 309-210-8390

Editor’s Note: Information was used from OwnYourLimits.org.
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